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LAS VEGAS BONSAI SOCIETYNEWSLETTER - MAR. 2012

MEETING:

Wednesday, MAR 14th at 7:00PMThis month will be a DEMONSTRATION on Deadwood and Tanuki with James Buchanan & Bob Kovach

The Las Vegas Bonsai Society meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00PM at the MIREBALLI COMMUNITY CENTER 6200 HARGROVE AVENUE, LAS VEGAS , NV 89107 visitors welcome. Call 257-4768 for directions.

WORKSHOP: SATURDAY, MAR. 17th @2:00pm2639WORKSHOP: SATURDAY, MAR. 24th @2:00pmWorkshops are held at Jim Gollmer's House 6698 Starshell Bay LV NV 89139

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: 2012 DUES ARE DUE Please see Jim BuchananFebruary 25-26 San Marino, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai-A-Thon XVI at The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens,

March 24 - 25Scotts Valley, CASanta Cruz Bonsai Kai: 24th Annual Bonsai Exhibit and Show at the Scotts Valley Community Center, 360 Kings Village Road from 10:30 AM - 4:30 PM both days. Demonstration by Mr. Katsumi Kinoshita will be at 2:00 PM each day. Plant sales and door prizes each day as well as raffle of demonstration trees and member prepared, well established bonsai material. For more information call 877-610-9038 or e-mail dakine45@comcast.net

Mar. 31 - Apr. 1Sacramento, CaliforniaBonsai Sekiyu Kai of Sacramento: 35th Annual Bonsai Show at the Sacramento Betsuin Buddhist Church, 2401 Riverside Blvd. Hours are: Saturday, 12-Noon - 5:00 PM, and Sunday, 10AM - 3:45PM. Demonstrations at 2PM, both days, by Bonsai Master Johnnie Uchida. Amenities include refreshments, light snacks, door prizes, raffles and a Silent Auction. Plant and bonsai tool sales also will be available. For more information contact Dareld Binns, dwbphoto9op@yahoo.com

April 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 2012Garden Grove, CaliforniaCalifornia Bonsai Society: 55th Convention and Show at the Crown Plaza Anaheim Resort, 12021 harbor Blvd. and starring the iron men of Naka, Frank Goya, Harry Hirao, Shig Miya, Ben Oki and Richard Ota. Also featuring Tomohiro Masumi, Ryan Neil, and Cheryl Manning, Kenji Miyata, David Nguy, Kathy Shaner and the members of CBS. There will be workshops, demonstrations, auctions, drawings, a huge vendor area and prizes & awards for early registrations. For registration information contact Elizabeth Partch at elizabethpartch@yahoo.com

April 14-15Sacramento, CaliforniaAmerican Bonsai Association, Sacramento: 53rd Annual Spring Show at the Shepard Garden and Arts Center, 3330 McKinley Ave, Sacramento, CA. Show hours are Saturday 10:00 AM " 5:00 PM, Sunday 10:00 AM " 4:00 PM. Demonstration each day at 1:30 PM by John Thompson followed by a raffle of bonsai (includes the demonstration tree) and bonsai related material. There is a large vendor area with club member trees, pots, etc. For information contact Greg McDonald at Gregandleeanne@comcast.net, by phone at 530-642-2521, or visit our website at http://abasbonsai.org/.

April 21-22, 2012Palo Alto, CAKusamura Bonsai Club: 52nd Annual Show at the Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road. Admission is free. Show hours are Saturday: 12 Noon - 5PM, and Sunday: 11AM - 5PM. There will be demonstrations, raffles, and club member tree sales both days. Guest demonstrator to be announced. For more information, contact Rita Curbow at 408-732-4957 or kusamura@gsbf-bonsai.org.

April 26, 27, 28, 29, 2012Costa Mesa, CaliforniaOrange Empire Bonsai Society: Bonsai Exhibition at the 23rd Annual Spring Garden Show at the South Coast Plaza, 3333 Bear Street. The show dates and times are Thursday and Friday from 10AM-9PM, Saturday from 10AM-8PM and Sunday 11AM-6:30PM. There will be a traditional display of bonsai trees with accent plants, along with an ongoing bonsai trimming demonstration. Al Nelson will conduct a saikei workshop seminar. The date and time are forthcoming. For more information please contact David Nadzam at dnadzam@socal.rr.com or 714-345-6966.

April 27-29, 2012Dallas, TexasLone Star Bonsai Federation Convention: Roots of Bonsai - Celebrating American Bonsai Masters Trained in Japan'. Locatedat the Sheraton Dallas North Hotel and emphasizing American artists with extended Japanese training. The headliners, with a combined total of 17 years of apprenticeship under eminent Japanese artists, are Kathy Shaner, Michael Hagedorn, and Ryan Neil. Demonstrations, exhibits, workshops, vendors, and more will be featured. Further information is available at www.bonsaisocietyofdallas.com.

May 5, 2012Jackson, CaliforniaAmador Bonsai Society: Peoples' Choice Show in conjunction with the Sierra Madre Garden Show at the Amador Senior Center, 229 New York Ranch Road. Show hours are 10AM-4PM. Free Admission. A bonsai demonstration will be offered.

May 5 & 6, 2012Sacramento, California66th Annual Sacramento Bonsai Club Show: Sacramento Buddhist Church, 2401 Riverside Blvd., May 5 (12-5pm) & 6 (10-4pm). Demonstrations both days, 2 pm, by Boon Manatikivipart, followed by benefit drawings. Free admission, plant and tree sales.

May 6, 2012Watsonville, California38th Annual Watsonville Bonsai Show, Watsonville Buddhist Temple 423 Bridge St. Exhibit opens at 10:00 am, with demonstration at 2:00 pm by club sensei Katsumi Kinoshita, recipient of the Agricultural Society of Japans Ryokuhaku-Juyukosho (Green and White Award), and GSBF Circle of Sensei award. A raffle of many bonsai items will be held after the demonstration which will include the demonstration tree. Make it a group or club trip parking available for buses. Over 50 trees will be on exhibit from shohin to ancient, from novices to experts. A small donation is requested. Tea and cookies will be served. For information contact Dave Dierking at 831-338-2771 / dcdierking@yahoo.com

BONSAI CARE - MARCH 2012

WATERING: DON'T OVER WATER Trees have begun breaking dormancy. Watch the weather closely, since those newly emerging leaves are very susceptible to frost damage. Watch soil moisture carefully. Pay special attention to deciduous trees as they use more water due to rapid growth.

FERTILIZING:

Begin Nitrogen fertilizer at reduced rate - Gold Dust, Mir-Acid, or any other commercial fertilizer.

INSECTICIDES:

Watch for aphids, borers, white flies & scale. Spray with insecticides as required.

WIRING AND PRUNING: Best time to wire, prune and style trees.

TRANSPLANTING: March through June is the best time to transplant or repot.

PROPAGATING/ GRAFTING: Still a good time to start cuttings, especially Plumb, Pomegranate & Willow. Best time to graft deciduous trees also

LOCATION OF TREES: Full sun up to 80 degrees, protect from wind.MISCELLANEOUS: PREPARE SHOW TREES!!!

LOCATION OF TREES: Trees such as elms, junipers, pines etc. can be left outdoors. Watch tropical's (Ficus, jade Bougainvillea etc.) carefully, as they will need to be brought inside eventually. A frost or very low temperatures can kill Bougainvillea. Protect trees from drying winds.

MISCELLANEOUS: Lime Sulphur Jin & deadwood. There are many wood preservers on the market that will keep the wood from rotting. (Rotten Wood Stabilizer by Bondo)

can be purchased at Loews and lime Sulphur can be applied over it.

REFRESHMENT LIST FOR 2012

Many thanks to Linda & Clarence Okimoto for bringing the refreshments again. There have been no volunteers for MAR. so there may not be refreshments.

JANBOB KOVACHFEB?MAR?APR?MAY?JUNE?JULY?AUG?SEPT?OCT?NOV20TH ANNA cake by clubDECCHRISTMAS PARTY

PRESIDENTS CORNER:

Casey Niederhauser, a club member from St. George, has renewed our web site, so visit and watch as it develops. Be sure to visit for the latest info. And to see yourself. Thanks again Casey. (http://lvbonsaisociety.com/)

I have included the number of a members address somewhere in the newsletter i.e. (7422). If it is your address number you will receive two free raffle tickets at that meeting (winners must be present).

It is everyone's job to participate in and promote the club or it will cease to be an organization just due to attrition. Try to interest a friend or relative to come to a meeting, after all they are free and there aren't many things that are these days

I will bring a new signup sheet for refreshments for 2012 to the meeting, don't be shy. James Buchanan, Jim Gollmer & myself went to The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens February 25 in San Marino, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai-A-Thon XVI and I sent out a link to some photos I took.

2012 DUES ARE DUE SEE JIM BUCHANANFor the time being they can be mailed to my house at 7422 ELBRIDGE WAY, LAS VEGAS, NV. 89113

See you at the meeting and bring a friendBob KovachPresident Las Vegas Bonsai Society

President: Bob Kovach

Vice President: Jim Gollmer

Treas.: Jim Buchanan

Sec: Muriel Scrivner257-4768

240-0672

274-3703

496-4763tubs78@cox.net

SOCIETY WEB SITE: http://lvbonsaisociety.com/

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LAS VEGAS BONSAI SOCIETYNEWSLETTER - JANUARY2012

MEETING:

Wednesday, JANUARY 12, 2012 at 7:00 pm.This meeting there will be a Winter Silhouettes demonstration by Jim Gollmer.This is when you can see all the work that goes into structuring a deciduous tree

The Las Vegas Bonsai Society meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00PM at the MIREBALLI COMMUNITY CENTER 6200 HARGROVE AVENUE, LAS VEGAS , NV 89107 visitors welcome. Call 257-4768 for directions.

WORKSHOP: SATURDAY, JANUARY 12th 2:00PMat Jim Gollmer's House 6698 Starshell Bay LV NV 89139

WORKSHOP: THURSDAY, JANUARY 21st 2:00PMWorkshops are held at Jim Gollmer's House 6698 Starshell Bay LV NV 89139

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: DUES ARE DUE

December 3Fresno, CaliforniaFresno Area Bonsai Clubs: Fourth Annual Bonsai Yard Sale at 736 West Browning Avenue from 8AM-3PM. There will be a very large selection of raw materials, some finished bonsai, used pots, books, magazines, and stands, all at very reasonable prices. Everyone is welcome to participate. If you wish to sell or trade bonsai related items or need a table, please contact us in advance so that we may plan space accordingly. Lunch will be available. Contact Ralph Schroeder at 559 271-8299 or ralsch@sbcglobal.net

December 27-January 1, 2012San Marino, CaliforniaCalifornia Aiseki Kai: 22nd Anniversary Exhibition of Viewing Stones Show in Friends Hall at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road. Hours are 10:30AM-4:30PM each day, and the display will be open on New Year's Day. Daily slide shows will repeat each hour, December 29-30, 2011. Free parking and free entry to our exhibit. For more information see our website: aisekikai.com or contact hutch@aisekikai.com

January 2012January 14-15Oakland, CaliforniaBay Island Bonsai: Annual Bonsai Exhibitat the Lakeside Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. Hours are 10AM"4PM, both days. On Saturday at 1PM there will be an auction, with a preview at 12Noon. Guided tours of the exhibit both days. Benefit Drawing (need not be present to win). Vendors; club member and educational bonsai material will be for sale. Free entry to the exhibit. Donations accepted. For more information call 510-919-5042 or visit www.bayislandbonsai.com

January 28-29Oakland, CaliforniaBay Area Bonsai Associates: 31st Annual Bonsai Exhibition at the Lakeside Park (Lake Merritt) Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. Show hours are Saturday, 5-9PM and a demonstration by Ryan Neil starts at 6:30PM, followed by a raffle of the demonstration tree. Sunday hours are 10AM-4PM. A plant sale (including bonsai related items such as pots, tools, soils, wires, books, etc.) will be continuous both days. Admission is free. For more information contact John Roehl at bigbluemoon@comcast.net or 707-827-3206.

February 2012February 4-6Santa Nella, CaliforniaCalifornia Shohin Seminar 2012 at the Hotel de Oro. Registration forms and information will be available starting October 30, 2011. Visit the website at www.calshohin.org or email calshohin@yahoo.com.

February 25-26San Marino, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai-A-Thon XVI at The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road. This is the annual fundraiser for the GSBF Collection at The Huntington. Admission to the event and to the Huntington Gardens is free with Bonsai-A-Thon "Early Bird" Registration. Hours are 7:30AM-4:30PM, both days. A pancake breakfast, a tour hosted by Jim Folsom (Director of the Garden), demonstrations, lunch, bonsai exhibits, large sales area, raffle, and an auction will all be featured. For more information contact Marge Blasingame, 626-579-0420 or margeblasingame@att.net.

February 25-26Oakland, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt: Mammoth Fundraiser, 2012 at the Lakeside Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. On Saturday an auction of fabulous bonsai will be from 1-4PM, with preview at 12Noon. Sunday hours are from 9AM-4PM and will feature demonstrations by Collection Curator, Kathy Shaner and Team, many vendors, a large consignment sale of bonsai and bonsai related items and several raffle drawings throughout the day. For general information email www.bonsailakemerritt@gmail.com, visit www.gsbf-bonsai.org/lake-merritt/NewHome.htm or phone Randi Keppeler 650-598-0127.

April 2012April 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 2012Garden Grove, CaliforniaCalifornia Bonsai Society: 55th Convention and Show at the Crown Plaza Anaheim Resort, 12021 harbor Blvd. and starring the iron men of Naka, Frank Goya, Harry Hirao, Shig Miya, Ben Oki and Richard Ota. Also featuring Tomohiro Masumi, Ryan Neil, and Cheryl Manning, Kenji Miyata, David Nguy, Kathy Shaner and the members of CBS. There will be workshops, demonstrations, auctions, drawings, a huge vendor area and prizes & awards for early registrations. For registration information contact Elizabeth Partch at elizabethpartch@yahoo.com

April 27-29, 2012Dallas, TexasLone Star Bonsai Federation Convention: Roots of Bonsai - Celebrating American Bonsai Masters Trained in Japan'. Locatedat the Sheraton Dallas North Hotel and emphasizing American artists with extended Japanese training. The headliners, with a combined total of 17 years of apprenticeship under eminent Japanese artists, are Kathy Shaner, Michael Hagedorn, and Ryan Neil. Demonstrations, exhibits, workshops, vendors, and more will be featured. Further information is available at www.bonsaisocietyofdallas.com.

BONSAI CARE - JANUARY 2012

WATERING: DON'T OVER WATER Temperatures are beginning to drop, evaporation is slowing, and trees are beginning to go dormant. Watering should be reduced accordingly to prevent root rot. Keep dormant trees from drying out completely but be cautious about over watering. Remember the winds can dry and damage your trees.

FERTILIZING:

No fertilizer should be applied until growth resumes in the spring.

INSECTICIDES:

Lime sulfur may be applied now if the tree is already dormant. Lime sulfur is going to be hard to find in the future so buy now if you can.

WIRING AND PRUNING: Little wiring or pruning should be done at this time. Good time to shape and wire deciduous trees. Don't bend limbs drastically.

TRANSPLANTING: The time for transplanting is past and none should be done until spring when trees begin to break dormancy.

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PROPAGATING/ GRAFTING: Propagating and grafting should not be done until spring when trees begin to break dormancy.

LOCATION OF TREES: Trees such as elms, junipers, pines etc. can be left outdoors. Watch tropical's (Ficus, jade Bougainvillea etc.) carefully, as they will need to be brought inside eventually. A frost or very low temperatures can kill Bougainvillea. Protect trees from drying winds.

MISCELLANEOUS: Lime Sulphur Jin & deadwood. There are many wood preservers on the market that will keep the wood from rotting. (Rotten Wood Stabilizer by Bondo)

can be purchased at Loews and lime Sulphur can be applied over it. This is a great time to study your trees and plan any changes you wish to make in the spring. Take notes so you remember what your plan was. It's also a good time for pot cleaning.

REFRESHMENT LIST FOR 2012Many thanks to CLARENCE &LINDA , Jim B. and EVERYONE else who brought refreshments this year. A new list will be available at the meeting, so don't be shy.

JANBOB KOVACHFEBMARAPRMAYJUNEJULYAUGSEPTOCTNOV22TH ANNA cake by clubDECCHRISTMAS PARTY

PRESIDENTS CORNER:

Be sure to visit for the latest info.. (http://lvbonsaisociety.com/)

It is everyone's job to participate in and promote the club or it will cease to be an organization just due to attrition. Try to interest a friend or relative to come to a meeting, after all they are free and there aren't many things that are these days

I would like to thank Jim Gollmer for all the work he has done this year and every year, both in the meetings & demonstrations. I would also like to thank James Buchanan for the great he's doing as treasurer.

Thank you Ev Bassin for your generous contributions throughout the year. We missed you and Sharon at the Christmas party, get well.

Thank you MURIEL for setting up the WHOLE Christmas party, I hope all had a great time.

2012 DUES ARE DUE, SEE JAMES THE MONEY MAN

Attached please find the 2012 ACTIVITIES CALENDAR

I have attached an interesting article written by Dr. Gary L. Wade, that was on the Bonsai by the Monastery web page, with his kind permission.

Be a Detective When Trouble-Shooting Plant Problemsby Dr. Gary L. Wade, Extension Horticulturist, UGA(This article has been adapted and edited for applicability to Bonsai, with permission, by Ted Groszkiewicz)Plants may not be able to talk, but they will let you know when they are sick. Wilted or discolored leaves, leaf spots, dying branches and premature leaf drop are just a few of the common symptoms of plant stress. Unfortunately, plant problems are not always clear-cut and easy to diagnose. They often involve a complex interaction of many different factors.According to plant pathologists at the UGA plant diagnostic clinic, the majority of disease problems can be directly attributed to environmental stress, such as excessive moisture, heat or drought. These factors weaken plants and make them more susceptible to disease and insect pests.Professional arborists say that most tree problems result from stress of the root system imposed by such things as drought, root disturbance during construction, changes in grade and drainage, fill dirt over the roots, soil compaction, etc. (In the area of handling roots, bonsai enthusiasts learn early on how to handle root systems at the proper time of the year for the species of plant material being used to style bonsai )When attempting to diagnose a plant illness make certain you gather all the facts that may have led to the problem and give the plant a thorough physical examination before attempting a cure. Never make snap judgments because the problem you perceive at first glance may not be the direct cause. Consider iron deficiency, for instance, on azaleas. Plants under moisture stress often exhibit iron deficiency. An extremely wet soil literally suffocates the root system. As a result, root rot organisms attack the damaged roots. The roots lose their ability to absorb nutrients like iron, and interveinal chlorosis is clearly exhibited by the leaves. Attempting to cure this problem with liquid iron or iron supplements to the soil is only a short term solution. The best remedy would be to modify the drainage of the site (container for bonsai) or to transplant the azalea to another location known to be well-drained (for bonsai, into another container with a better draining soil mix).The second major cause of plant problems is poor cultural or management practices. We can literally love our plants to death by applying luxurious quantities of fertilizer and water or by spraying routinely even when there are no pests in the vicinity. (For some reason I find that many bonsai enthusiasts enter a phase, sometimes prolonged, of deeply caring for their plants to the extent that their TLC results in dead plants as mentioned above.) Planting too deep is another common cultural mistake. When plants are set too deeply in the soil (even in a bonsai container), the lower portion of the root system can become deprived of oxygen and dies. Plants stressed in this manner often die a slow, agonizing death.The most complex problems to diagnose are those resulting from a combination of environmental factors and poor cultural practices. Placing rhododendrons in hot baking afternoon sun without the benefit of irrigation will result in the bleaching of foliage. (This is also true of azaleas, rhododendrons and other broad-leaved evergreens that are exposed in a similar manner without irrigation.) The immediate reaction to this problem is that the plants are hungry, so a generous amount of fertilizer is applied in an attempt to snap the plants out of this problem. Unfortunately, this practice adds insult to injury and the plants eventually die. But what if you examine the plants in the morning hours when they are fully shaded and the client swears he did nothing out of the ordinary to the plants? Remember, the client is always innocent until proven guilty.The best advice when diagnosing a plant problem is to approach it in a logical step-by-step sequence, gathering all the clues along the way. The following is my five step method for approaching a plant problem. It works for me.Step 1: Identify the plant. You don't need to know the precise botanical name of the plant, but simply the type of plant it is. Then begin to analyze the types of problems that type of plant often encounters. If the plant is a juniper, for instance, you can frequently suspect three problems: spider mites (look for them with a hand lens working on the inside foliage); juniper twig blight (look for twig die-back from the tips and black spores with the hand lens); and wet-feet (junipers cannot tolerate poorly drained soil).Step 2: Check the Environment of the Area. What has been the weather patterns prior to the problem? Has there been an ice storm, a drought or a deep freeze? Are other plants in the general area showing the same symptoms, or is this an isolated case? What is the drainage like on the site? (For bonsai, the container soil may have become waterlogged?) Are there any chunks of mortar or lime-rock in the soil that may be elevating the pH level? (It is possible that too much dolomitic limestone may have been added to the container soil for bonsai.)Step 3: Ask questions. You'll be surprised how much you can learn about the recent past of the plant just by asking questions about cultural practices. (As a bonsai enthusiast you can ask yourself these questions.) Has the plant been fertilized recently, pruned recently, or sprayed with some sort of chemical? Were there any chemical spills recently near the plants? Are there may long-legged dogs in the neighborhood? Etc., etc.Step 4: Be Prepared to Take Samples. Put together a simple diagnostic kit and carry it with you when visiting clients (or when checking your own landscape or bonsai plants). The kit should consist of the following items:1. A Ziploc Bag for preserving fresh leaf samples or for keeping a root sample moist if it is to be analyzed for nematodes. (This is a must if you have to send samples off for diagnosis through your County Extension Office.)2. A Knife for checking to see if the plant is still alive after a severe freeze. A green cambium below the outer bark indicates that the plant is still alive. A knife is also useful for digging out insect larvae, such as the peach tree borer in areas where sap is protruding from the main trunk. This is not the cure for the problem, but an excellent way to show the client what the problem is. (If you don't recognize the insect problem, check with your County Extension Office for a possible I.D. or have the sample sent to the Entomology Department through your Extension Office for an I.D.)3. A Magnifying Glass is useful for seeing tiny insects, such as mites and thrips that may be difficult to see with the naked eye. Most variety drug stores and art supply stores sell magnifying glasses. Try to get one with at least 3X magnification.4. A Soil Sample Bag is always handy if a soil sample is deemed necessary. (These are available through the County Extension Offices in Georgia (and other States.)) There is a minimal charge for a routine soil sample. Soil-less mixes (formulas) carry an extra charge. Check with your local Extension Office.5. A White Note Card is useful for detecting tiny insects such as flower thrips and mites. Simply shake the plant part over the white card and look for the insects moving against the white background.Step 5: Focus on the plant. Look at the leaves for signs of insect or disease damage. Distinct brown spots on the leaves surrounded by a dark halo may indicate a disease problem. A foliar scorching often indicates a root problem (excessive moisture, over-fertilization, drought, etc.). Inspect the stems and branches for swollen areas or cankers, insect punctures, sap flowing from insect entry holes, or mechanical damage to the trunk. Then look at the root system for signs of decay. White fibrous roots should be evident near the drip like or tip of the canopy. (Remove the bonsai from the container and check the root system; the white fibrous roots should be evident around the root-ball which makes contact with the interior of the container.) If the roots appear brown and decayed, look closer at the planting site for a possible cause. (For bonsai check the container soil and condition of roots for a possible cause.)So be a detective when attempting to solve a plant problem. Know the plant, its cultural requirements and common problems. Survey the site, ask questions, take samples if necessary, and check the weather records and give the plant a thorough check-up. Remember that the symptoms you first perceive may not be the primary cause of the problem. By approaching the problem in a methodical fashion, you may not be correct in your diagnosis all the time, but you will be correct most of the time.

Bonsai by the Monastery2625 Hwy. 212 SW Conyers, GA 30094-4044800-778-POTS(7687) (locally: 770-388-0531) Fax: 770-760-0989Email: bonsaimonk@bonsaimonk.com

See you at the meeting and bring a friendBob KovachPresident Las Vegas Bonsai Society

President: Bob Kovach

Vice President: Jim Gollmer

Treas.: Merle Vande Weerd

Sec: Muriel Shrivner257-4768

240-0672

897-2166

496-3763tubs78@cox.net

SOCIETY WEB SITE: http://lvbonsaisociety.com/

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MEETING:

Wednesday, JANUARY 12, 2012 at 7:00 pm.This meeting there will be a Winter Silhouettes demonstration by Jim Gollmer.This is when you can see all the work that goes into structuring a deciduous tree

The Las Vegas Bonsai Society meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00PM at the MIREBALLI COMMUNITY CENTER 6200 HARGROVE AVENUE, LAS VEGAS , NV 89107 visitors welcome. Call 257-4768 for directions.

WORKSHOP: SATURDAY, JANUARY 12th 2:00PMat Jim Gollmer's House 6698 Starshell Bay LV NV 89139

WORKSHOP: THURSDAY, JANUARY 21st 2:00PMWorkshops are held at Jim Gollmer's House 6698 Starshell Bay LV NV 89139

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: DUES ARE DUE

December 3Fresno, CaliforniaFresno Area Bonsai Clubs: Fourth Annual Bonsai Yard Sale at 736 West Browning Avenue from 8AM-3PM. There will be a very large selection of raw materials, some finished bonsai, used pots, books, magazines, and stands, all at very reasonable prices. Everyone is welcome to participate. If you wish to sell or trade bonsai related items or need a table, please contact us in advance so that we may plan space accordingly. Lunch will be available. Contact Ralph Schroeder at 559 271-8299 or ralsch@sbcglobal.net

December 27-January 1, 2012San Marino, CaliforniaCalifornia Aiseki Kai: 22nd Anniversary Exhibition of Viewing Stones Show in Friends Hall at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road. Hours are 10:30AM-4:30PM each day, and the display will be open on New Year's Day. Daily slide shows will repeat each hour, December 29-30, 2011. Free parking and free entry to our exhibit. For more information see our website: aisekikai.com or contact hutch@aisekikai.com

January 2012January 14-15Oakland, CaliforniaBay Island Bonsai: Annual Bonsai Exhibitat the Lakeside Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. Hours are 10AM"4PM, both days. On Saturday at 1PM there will be an auction, with a preview at 12Noon. Guided tours of the exhibit both days. Benefit Drawing (need not be present to win). Vendors; club member and educational bonsai material will be for sale. Free entry to the exhibit. Donations accepted. For more information call 510-919-5042 or visit www.bayislandbonsai.com

January 28-29Oakland, CaliforniaBay Area Bonsai Associates: 31st Annual Bonsai Exhibition at the Lakeside Park (Lake Merritt) Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. Show hours are Saturday, 5-9PM and a demonstration by Ryan Neil starts at 6:30PM, followed by a raffle of the demonstration tree. Sunday hours are 10AM-4PM. A plant sale (including bonsai related items such as pots, tools, soils, wires, books, etc.) will be continuous both days. Admission is free. For more information contact John Roehl at bigbluemoon@comcast.net or 707-827-3206.

February 2012February 4-6Santa Nella, CaliforniaCalifornia Shohin Seminar 2012 at the Hotel de Oro. Registration forms and information will be available starting October 30, 2011. Visit the website at www.calshohin.org or email calshohin@yahoo.com.

February 25-26San Marino, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai-A-Thon XVI at The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road. This is the annual fundraiser for the GSBF Collection at The Huntington. Admission to the event and to the Huntington Gardens is free with Bonsai-A-Thon "Early Bird" Registration. Hours are 7:30AM-4:30PM, both days. A pancake breakfast, a tour hosted by Jim Folsom (Director of the Garden), demonstrations, lunch, bonsai exhibits, large sales area, raffle, and an auction will all be featured. For more information contact Marge Blasingame, 626-579-0420 or margeblasingame@att.net.

February 25-26Oakland, CaliforniaGSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt: Mammoth Fundraiser, 2012 at the Lakeside Garden Center, 666 Bellevue Avenue. On Saturday an auction of fabulous bonsai will be from 1-4PM, with preview at 12Noon. Sunday hours are from 9AM-4PM and will feature demonstrations by Collection Curator, Kathy Shaner and Team, many vendors, a large consignment sale of bonsai and bonsai related items and several raffle drawings throughout the day. For general information email www.bonsailakemerritt@gmail.com, visit www.gsbf-bonsai.org/lake-merritt/NewHome.htm or phone Randi Keppeler 650-598-0127.

April 2012April 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 2012Garden Grove, CaliforniaCalifornia Bonsai Society: 55th Convention and Show at the Crown Plaza Anaheim Resort, 12021 harbor Blvd. and starring the iron men of Naka, Frank Goya, Harry Hirao, Shig Miya, Ben Oki and Richard Ota. Also featuring Tomohiro Masumi, Ryan Neil, and Cheryl Manning, Kenji Miyata, David Nguy, Kathy Shaner and the members of CBS. There will be workshops, demonstrations, auctions, drawings, a huge vendor area and prizes & awards for early registrations. For registration information contact Elizabeth Partch at elizabethpartch@yahoo.com

April 27-29, 2012Dallas, TexasLone Star Bonsai Federation Convention: Roots of Bonsai - Celebrating American Bonsai Masters Trained in Japan'. Locatedat the Sheraton Dallas North Hotel and emphasizing American artists with extended Japanese training. The headliners, with a combined total of 17 years of apprenticeship under eminent Japanese artists, are Kathy Shaner, Michael Hagedorn, and Ryan Neil. Demonstrations, exhibits, workshops, vendors, and more will be featured. Further information is available at www.bonsaisocietyofdallas.com.

BONSAI CARE - JANUARY 2012

WATERING: DON'T OVER WATER Temperatures are beginning to drop, evaporation is slowing, and trees are beginning to go dormant. Watering should be reduced accordingly to prevent root rot. Keep dormant trees from drying out completely but be cautious about over watering. Remember the winds can dry and damage your trees.

FERTILIZING:

No fertilizer should be applied until growth resumes in the spring.

INSECTICIDES:

Lime sulfur may be applied now if the tree is already dormant. Lime sulfur is going to be hard to find in the future so buy now if you can.

WIRING AND PRUNING: Little wiring or pruning should be done at this time. Good time to shape and wire deciduous trees. Don't bend limbs drastically.

TRANSPLANTING: The time for transplanting is past and none should be done until spring when trees begin to break dormancy.

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PROPAGATING/ GRAFTING: Propagating and grafting should not be done until spring when trees begin to break dormancy.

LOCATION OF TREES: Trees such as elms, junipers, pines etc. can be left outdoors. Watch tropical's (Ficus, jade Bougainvillea etc.) carefully, as they will need to be brought inside eventually. A frost or very low temperatures can kill Bougainvillea. Protect trees from drying winds.

MISCELLANEOUS: Lime Sulphur Jin & deadwood. There are many wood preservers on the market that will keep the wood from rotting. (Rotten Wood Stabilizer by Bondo)

can be purchased at Loews and lime Sulphur can be applied over it. This is a great time to study your trees and plan any changes you wish to make in the spring. Take notes so you remember what your plan was. It's also a good time for pot cleaning.

REFRESHMENT LIST FOR 2012Many thanks to CLARENCE &LINDA , Jim B. and EVERYONE else who brought refreshments this year. A new list will be available at the meeting, so don't be shy.

JANBOB KOVACHFEBMARAPRMAYJUNEJULYAUGSEPTOCTNOV22TH ANNA cake by clubDECCHRISTMAS PARTY

PRESIDENTS CORNER:

Be sure to visit for the latest info.. (http://lvbonsaisociety.com/)

It is everyone's job to participate in and promote the club or it will cease to be an organization just due to attrition. Try to interest a friend or relative to come to a meeting, after all they are free and there aren't many things that are these days

I would like to thank Jim Gollmer for all the work he has done this year and every year, both in the meetings & demonstrations. I would also like to thank James Buchanan for the great he's doing as treasurer.

Thank you Ev Bassin for your generous contributions throughout the year. We missed you and Sharon at the Christmas party, get well.

Thank you MURIEL for setting up the WHOLE Christmas party, I hope all had a great time.

2012 DUES ARE DUE, SEE JAMES THE MONEY MAN

Attached please find the 2012 ACTIVITIES CALENDAR

I have attached an interesting article written by Dr. Gary L. Wade, that was on the Bonsai by the Monastery web page, with his kind permission.

Be a Detective When Trouble-Shooting Plant Problemsby Dr. Gary L. Wade, Extension Horticulturist, UGA(This article has been adapted and edited for applicability to Bonsai, with permission, by Ted Groszkiewicz)Plants may not be able to talk, but they will let you know when they are sick. Wilted or discolored leaves, leaf spots, dying branches and premature leaf drop are just a few of the common symptoms of plant stress. Unfortunately, plant problems are not always clear-cut and easy to diagnose. They often involve a complex interaction of many different factors.According to plant pathologists at the UGA plant diagnostic clinic, the majority of disease problems can be directly attributed to environmental stress, such as excessive moisture, heat or drought. These factors weaken plants and make them more susceptible to disease and insect pests.Professional arborists say that most tree problems result from stress of the root system imposed by such things as drought, root disturbance during construction, changes in grade and drainage, fill dirt over the roots, soil compaction, etc. (In the area of handling roots, bonsai enthusiasts learn early on how to handle root systems at the proper time of the year for the species of plant material being used to style bonsai )When attempting to diagnose a plant illness make certain you gather all the facts that may have led to the problem and give the plant a thorough physical examination before attempting a cure. Never make snap judgments because the problem you perceive at first glance may not be the direct cause. Consider iron deficiency, for instance, on azaleas. Plants under moisture stress often exhibit iron deficiency. An extremely wet soil literally suffocates the root system. As a result, root rot organisms attack the damaged roots. The roots lose their ability to absorb nutrients like iron, and interveinal chlorosis is clearly exhibited by the leaves. Attempting to cure this problem with liquid iron or iron supplements to the soil is only a short term solution. The best remedy would be to modify the drainage of the site (container for bonsai) or to transplant the azalea to another location known to be well-drained (for bonsai, into another container with a better draining soil mix).The second major cause of plant problems is poor cultural or management practices. We can literally love our plants to death by applying luxurious quantities of fertilizer and water or by spraying routinely even when there are no pests in the vicinity. (For some reason I find that many bonsai enthusiasts enter a phase, sometimes prolonged, of deeply caring for their plants to the extent that their TLC results in dead plants as mentioned above.) Planting too deep is another common cultural mistake. When plants are set too deeply in the soil (even in a bonsai container), the lower portion of the root system can become deprived of oxygen and dies. Plants stressed in this manner often die a slow, agonizing death.The most complex problems to diagnose are those resulting from a combination of environmental factors and poor cultural practices. Placing rhododendrons in hot baking afternoon sun without the benefit of irrigation will result in the bleaching of foliage. (This is also true of azaleas, rhododendrons and other broad-leaved evergreens that are exposed in a similar manner without irrigation.) The immediate reaction to this problem is that the plants are hungry, so a generous amount of fertilizer is applied in an attempt to snap the plants out of this problem. Unfortunately, this practice adds insult to injury and the plants eventually die. But what if you examine the plants in the morning hours when they are fully shaded and the client swears he did nothing out of the ordinary to the plants? Remember, the client is always innocent until proven guilty.The best advice when diagnosing a plant problem is to approach it in a logical step-by-step sequence, gathering all the clues along the way. The following is my five step method for approaching a plant problem. It works for me.Step 1: Identify the plant. You don't need to know the precise botanical name of the plant, but simply the type of plant it is. Then begin to analyze the types of problems that type of plant often encounters. If the plant is a juniper, for instance, you can frequently suspect three problems: spider mites (look for them with a hand lens working on the inside foliage); juniper twig blight (look for twig die-back from the tips and black spores with the hand lens); and wet-feet (junipers cannot tolerate poorly drained soil).Step 2: Check the Environment of the Area. What has been the weather patterns prior to the problem? Has there been an ice storm, a drought or a deep freeze? Are other plants in the general area showing the same symptoms, or is this an isolated case? What is the drainage like on the site? (For bonsai, the container soil may have become waterlogged?) Are there any chunks of mortar or lime-rock in the soil that may be elevating the pH level? (It is possible that too much dolomitic limestone may have been added to the container soil for bonsai.)Step 3: Ask questions. You'll be surprised how much you can learn about the recent past of the plant just by asking questions about cultural practices. (As a bonsai enthusiast you can ask yourself these questions.) Has the plant been fertilized recently, pruned recently, or sprayed with some sort of chemical? Were there any chemical spills recently near the plants? Are there may long-legged dogs in the neighborhood? Etc., etc.Step 4: Be Prepared to Take Samples. Put together a simple diagnostic kit and carry it with you when visiting clients (or when checking your own landscape or bonsai plants). The kit should consist of the following items:1. A Ziploc Bag for preserving fresh leaf samples or for keeping a root sample moist if it is to be analyzed for nematodes. (This is a must if you have to send samples off for diagnosis through your County Extension Office.)2. A Knife for checking to see if the plant is still alive after a severe freeze. A green cambium below the outer bark indicates that the plant is still alive. A knife is also useful for digging out insect larvae, such as the peach tree borer in areas where sap is protruding from the main trunk. This is not the cure for the problem, but an excellent way to show the client what the problem is. (If you don't recognize the insect problem, check with your County Extension Office for a possible I.D. or have the sample sent to the Entomology Department through your Extension Office for an I.D.)3. A Magnifying Glass is useful for seeing tiny insects, such as mites and thrips that may be difficult to see with the naked eye. Most variety drug stores and art supply stores sell magnifying glasses. Try to get one with at least 3X magnification.4. A Soil Sample Bag is always handy if a soil sample is deemed necessary. (These are available through the County Extension Offices in Georgia (and other States.)) There is a minimal charge for a routine soil sample. Soil-less mixes (formulas) carry an extra charge. Check with your local Extension Office.5. A White Note Card is useful for detecting tiny insects such as flower thrips and mites. Simply shake the plant part over the white card and look for the insects moving against the white background.Step 5: Focus on the plant. Look at the leaves for signs of insect or disease damage. Distinct brown spots on the leaves surrounded by a dark halo may indicate a disease problem. A foliar scorching often indicates a root problem (excessive moisture, over-fertilization, drought, etc.). Inspect the stems and branches for swollen areas or cankers, insect punctures, sap flowing from insect entry holes, or mechanical damage to the trunk. Then look at the root system for signs of decay. White fibrous roots should be evident near the drip like or tip of the canopy. (Remove the bonsai from the container and check the root system; the white fibrous roots should be evident around the root-ball which makes contact with the interior of the container.) If the roots appear brown and decayed, look closer at the planting site for a possible cause. (For bonsai check the container soil and condition of roots for a possible cause.)So be a detective when attempting to solve a plant problem. Know the plant, its cultural requirements and common problems. Survey the site, ask questions, take samples if necessary, and check the weather records and give the plant a thorough check-up. Remember that the symptoms you first perceive may not be the primary cause of the problem. By approaching the problem in a methodical fashion, you may not be correct in your diagnosis all the time, but you will be correct most of the time.

Bonsai by the Monastery2625 Hwy. 212 SW Conyers, GA 30094-4044800-778-POTS(7687) (locally: 770-388-0531) Fax: 770-760-0989Email: bonsaimonk@bonsaimonk.com

See you at the meeting and bring a friendBob KovachPresident Las Vegas Bonsai Society

President: Bob Kovach

Vice President: Jim Gollmer

Treas.: Merle Vande Weerd

Sec: Muriel Shrivner257-4768

240-0672

897-2166

496-3763tubs78@cox.net

SOCIETY WEB SITE: http://lvbonsaisociety.com/

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Posted in Home_Improvement Post Date 02/04/2020


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